KFC News

HE'S NO CHICKEN: KFC COLONEL TO MAKE AN "EXTREME" LUNCH DELIVERY 38 STORIES ABOVE THE CHICAGO RIVER

After Soliciting Suggestions via Social Media, KFC® Colonel to Deliver $5 Everyday Meals to Skyscraper Window Washers at "High" Noon Today in the Windy City

The KFC Colonel hangs high above the Chicago River to serve lunch to high rise window washers. CHICAGO, IL – Bringing new meaning to "haute cuisine," KFC will give lunch an extreme makeover by dispatching its KFC Colonel to personally deliver new $5 Everyday Meals to window washers working nearly 40 stories up at Chicago's "River Bend" building. At noon today, the KFC Colonel will strap on a harness and descend 38 floors with food in tow, demonstrating KFC's commitment to taking lunchtime meals to all new heights.

To launch the everyday lunch value, Kentucky Fried Chicken asked America via its social media channels to name folks in need of a "So Good" extreme lunch delivery. After sorting through more than 100 "out-of-the-bucket" occupations (including working at Area 51, changing the lights that top water towers and skyscrapers and trimming trees), the chain decided to literally send its KFC Colonel up in the air to bring lunch to one of America's most extreme occupations – high rise window washers.

"With the introduction of our $5 Everyday Meals, we're encouraging America to go above and beyond a simple sub for $5 and reward themselves with a real meal deal everyday of the week," said Barry Westrum, chief marketing officer for KFC. "And, what better way to highlight the tremendous value of these $5 box meals than with an extreme lunch delivery to a location nominated by our fans?"

Residents of Chicago's River Bend building, employees of neighboring skyscrapers and passersby will be able to view the KFC Colonel in his iconic white suit on scaffolding high above the city streets as the world's most popular chicken restaurant chain demonstrates once again it is willing to go to any length to serve its customers.

An Everyday Value, for just $5

KFC's $5 Everyday Meals feature five options for a delicious lunch value. Consumers can choose two pieces of Original Recipe®, Extra Crispy or Kentucky Grilled Chicken®, an Original Recipe Boneless Filet, a Doublicious chicken sandwich or three Extra Crispy Strips – each served with your choice of side, a buttermilk biscuit and medium soft drink for only $5 (plus tax). The offer is available at participating KFC restaurants coast-to-coast. (Offer available for a limited time at participating KFC® restaurants. Prices may vary. Tax extra. Extra charge for breast piece substitution.)

About KFC
KFC Corporation, based in Louisville, Ky., is the world’s most popular chicken restaurant chain specializing in Original Recipe®, Extra Crispy, Kentucky Grilled Chicken® and Crispy Strips with home-style sides, Honey BBQ Wings, and freshly made chicken sandwiches including the Double Down and the Doublicious. There are more than 15,000 KFC outlets in 109 countries and territories around the world serving some 12 million customers each day. KFC Corporation is a subsidiary of Yum! Brands, Inc., Louisville, Ky. (NYSE: YUM.) For more information, visit www.kfc.com. Follow KFC on Facebook (www.facebook.com/KFC) and Twitter (www.twitter.com/kfc).

About Colonel Sanders
The Kentucky Fried Chicken concept was pioneered by Colonel Harland Sanders (1890-1980), whose cooking career began at age six. Sanders held jobs ranging from streetcar conductor to insurance salesman, but his cooking skills were a constant throughout his life. In 1930, Sanders operated a service station in Corbin, Ky., and filled the stomachs of hungry travelers who stopped in to fill up their gas tanks. Sanders soon moved his restaurant across the street when he could no longer keep up with the demand from travelers who he had been feeding at his kitchen table. In 1935, the Kentucky Governor made Sanders an honorary Kentucky Colonel for his contributions to the state's cuisine. Over the next decade, the Colonel perfected his secret blend of 11 herbs and spices and the basic cooking technique still used at KFC today. When Sanders was 65, a new interstate highway forced the closure of his restaurant and he was left with only his recipe for fried chicken and a $105 Social Security check. The Colonel hit the road and struck handshake deals with restaurant owners who agreed to sell his fried chicken. What began as a dream fueled by the Original Recipe, a no-quit attitude and a Social Security check grew into the world's largest chicken restaurant chain. Until he passed away in 1980 at the age of 90, the Colonel still traveled 250,000 miles a year visiting KFC restaurants around the world.